Culture 3 min read

Space Rocks Debunk Apollo 11 Moon Landing Conspiracy Theories

Contradicting 6% of Americans, rocks collected from the moon debunk all the conspiracy theories about the, now iconic, 1969 moon landing. Tough, it’s unlikely the new evidence would finally win over skeptics.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Here’s a quick question: what you think would infuriate Buzz Aldrin the most? You likely guessed right, it’s the fake moon landing story.

We have to raise our hat to Buzz Aldrin, going on 90, for his energy and unfettering enthusiasm, as one of only 12 men who have ever walked on the moon, including other three still alive.

In 2002, Buzz Aldrin punched a guy in the face after insisting that the moon landing was a hoax, and we give him a pass on that one as the police did. Just calling Buzz “a liar, coward and thief” without bringing any challenging thoughts or evidence to the table earns you a punch from the moonwalker.

Buzz was there and lived through the whole experience as the second man to put his feet on the lunar soil after the Apollo 11 mission commander Neil Armstrong. Like other astronauts, he also left some trash and personal mementos there.

But a sizeable portion of the American society still believes that astronauts didn’t step on the lunar soil, at least the Apollo 11 mission, and see everything as a complete cover-up.

The Moon Landing is “Impossible to Fake,” Rocks Say so!

As the Apollo 11 mission to the moon (July 20, 1969) is celebrating its 50th anniversary, a new study provides further evidence that the lunar landing indeed happened.

An international team of experts from different institutions, including the Australian National University (ANU), argue it’d be too difficult, if not impossible, to create moon rocks, and stage such a global hoax.

Professor Trevor Ireland, a space rock scientist at the ANU Research School of Earth Sciences, said:

“Any attempt to make moon rocks in a laboratory would be a monumental failure and likely cost more money than it took NASA to get to the moon and back. The lunar soil is like nothing we have seen before on Earth. It is the result of eons of bombardment on the surface of the moon. The rocks have compositions that are unique to the moon.”

There you have it!

Notwithstanding the huge amount of evidence, millions of Americans remain convinced that the moon landing never happened and the scenes were scripted and staged like in a Hollywood movie.

The results of a poll conducted in June 2019 show that 6% of Americans, down from 30% in 1970, believe the Apollo 11 mission was faked. That’s despite accounts of hundreds of thousands of people who worked on the Apollo project, thousands of photos, TV footages, and geologic samples.

Three hundred and eighty kilograms of moon rocks were brought back and are still kept safe in a vacuum of pure nitrogen at the Lunar Vault of Houston Space Center.

We won’t be getting into how the moon landing hoax rumors got traction, like the Vietnam War and the whole geopolitical context in the late 1960s, or their weak evidence of a fake landing like the rippling flag or the absence of stars.

So far, science and evidence brought back from the moon have debunked every claim conspiracy theorists made, but they don’t seem like stopping anytime soon. Will this new evidence make any difference to deniers and conspiracy theorists?

Read More: 10,000+ New Moon Landing Photos Released; Buzz Aldrin Speaks

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Zayan Guedim

Trilingual poet, investigative journalist, and novelist. Zed loves tackling the big existential questions and all-things quantum.

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