Technology 2 min read

OneWeb Launches First Batch of Satellites for its Global Internet Constellation

In a huge step towards universal internet access, U.k company OneWeb has launched their first satellites in the construction of their global internet constellation.

OneWeb's Global Internet Constellation of Satellites will orbit Earth at different altitudes | OneWeb

OneWeb's Global Internet Constellation of Satellites will orbit Earth at different altitudes | OneWeb

U.K.-based communications company OneWeb just successfully launched the first batch of satellites to form a Global Internet Constellation. The satellites, carried into space by an Arianespace Soyuz rocket, launched Wednesday night on the coast of French Guiana.

In an interview with Forbes, OneWeb CEO Adrian Steckel said:

“I think this is going to be a historic day for the way we use space and technology to provide connectivity and use that spectrum to benefit the world.”

Founded in 2012, OneWeb aims to create the first 5G ready network from space.  The final goal is to provide Internet access to millions of people from anywhere on Earth.

In this new generation of Internet satellite technology, OneWeb joins SpaceX as the second company to actually put space probes into low-Earth orbit.

In February last year, SpaceX launched its two test satellites Microsat 2A and Microsat 2B to validate the design and functionality of the Starlink platform.

OneWeb’s Global Internet Constellation

OneWeb’s global Internet constellation will contain 648 satellites, each circling the Earth in near-polar orbits at an altitude of 1,200 kilometers. The company’s goal is to provide global Internet access through Ku-band radio frequencies by 2021.

After deploying the satellites, the company will then move to increase the total number of Earth-orbiting Internet satellites to over 900.

According to a tweet made by OneWeb’s founder Greg Wyler last month, 600 is only the minimum number of satellites the company needs to “achieve global coverage” and reach “enough profitability to self-fund growth.”

However, in an interview with SpaceNews in 2017, Wyler hinted at the launching of 2,000 satellites in different altitudes of orbit.

Read More: FCC Grants SpaceX Approval To Deploy 7,000 Broadband Satellites

Found this article interesting?

Let Rechelle Ann Fuertes know how much you appreciate this article by clicking the heart icon and by sharing this article on social media.


Profile Image

Rechelle Ann Fuertes

Rechelle is an SEO content producer, technical writer, researcher, social media manager, and visual artist. She enjoys traveling and spending time anywhere near the sea with family and friends.

Comments (0)
Most Recent most recent
You
5
share Scroll to top

Link Copied Successfully

Sign in

Sign in to access your personalized homepage, follow authors and topics you love, and clap for stories that matter to you.

Sign in with Google Sign in with Facebook

By using our site you agree to our privacy policy.