Science 2 min read

NASA Astronauts Arrive at the International Space Station

Paopano / Shutterstock.com

Paopano / Shutterstock.com

After a successful launch on Saturday, SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft and NASA astronauts arrived at the International Space Station on Sunday.

On Saturday, SpaceX made history when it launched NASA astronauts into orbit from the United States soil. Now, the Dragon Capsule has successfully docked in the International Space Station.

The historic launch was initially set to take place last Wednesday, despite the pandemic. However, NASA and SpaceX had to postpone due to stormy clouds and downpours.

The second time was the charm.

Now, SpaceX has become the first for-profit group to launch human astronauts into orbit in a commercial spacecraft. What’s more, it’s also the first time astronauts have been sent to the International Space Station from U.S. soil since 2011.

The crewed mission was a test flight, meaning NASA and SpaceX are assessing the spacecraft’s performance. So far, the answer is very well.

According to NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley, the spacecraft’s performance has been impeccable.

I’m breathing a sigh of relief,said NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine. “But, I will also tell you: I’m not gonna celebrate until Bob and Doug are home safely.”

Launching NASA Astronauts into Orbit

NASA astronauts, Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley launched the Crew Dragon spacecraft atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at about 3:22 pm.

The spacecraft entered orbit roughly nine minutes after the launch. Finally, the astronauts floated into the space station at about 1:22 pm on Sunday, 22 hours after they’d left Florida.

Meanwhile, the reusable first stage of the Falcon 9 rocket returned safely to the surface. The rocket landed on the SpaceX’s drone ship, “Of Course, I Still Love You.”

This is the culmination of a dream,” SpaceX CEO Elon Musk told CBS during a Tuesday interview.

This is a dream come true. In fact, it feels surreal. If you asked me when starting SpaceX, if this would happen, I’d be like, one percent — 0.1 percent chance.

Read More: COVID-19 Concerns: NASA Suspends Work on Moon Rocket

First AI Web Content Optimization Platform Just for Writers

Found this article interesting?

Let Sumbo Bello know how much you appreciate this article by clicking the heart icon and by sharing this article on social media.


Profile Image

Sumbo Bello

Sumbo Bello is a creative writer who enjoys creating data-driven content for news sites. In his spare time, he plays basketball and listens to Coldplay.

Comments (0)
Least Recent least recent
You
share Scroll to top

Link Copied Successfully

Sign in

Sign in to access your personalized homepage, follow authors and topics you love, and clap for stories that matter to you.

Sign in with Google Sign in with Facebook

By using our site you agree to our privacy policy.