Marketing 3 min read

How Remarketing Affects The Way Consumers Perceive Brand

While remarketing is an excellent technique to raise brand awareness, it could have an opposite effect on your target audience. Here are some of the things that you should know first before you resort to this kind of marketing strategy.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

Image courtesy of Shutterstock

About 40 percent of consumers say that remarketing distracts and annoy them.

At some point, while surfing the web, you may have stumbled upon a Game of Thrones game ad, and you got curious. So, you clicked it.

One month after the tv series’ disappointing end, the annoying GOT ad still kept popping up when you visit websites, reminding you of something you would rather forget.

That’s what remarketing is all about. It’s a way to connect with people who previously interacted with your brand, whether through a mobile app or website.

Remarketing often involves strategically placing your ads in front of an audience over and over again to increase your brand awareness, and encourage them to make purchases. Unfortunately, it could have the opposite effect.

According to research released on Wednesday, roughly 40 percent of shoppers dislike seeing the same advertisement repeatedly. In other words, when mismanaged, remarketing could harm your brand perception.

Remarketing: Breaking Down the Numbers

Here is everything you should know about this marketing strategy.

It’s Not As Bad As You’d Imagine

Remarketing can be useful, but not all the time. About 23 percent of shoppers who repeatedly saw a brand ended up making a purchase.

While 34 percent of the participant in the survey said that they like remarketing to some degree, another 37 percent dislike it. About 31 percent of the respondents claim to be indifferent to the marketing technique.

With that said, the numbers experienced slight changes when the researchers considered the product category.

It’s Not For Insurance Companies

Thirty-five percent of the respondents said they don’t mind remarketing in the “Electronic” category. Another 37 percent said they enjoyed it when the product category is “Apparel”.

Financial institutions have no such luck. In this case, only 6 percent of the respondents are willing to accept the ad strategy. According to the researchers, this is due to privacy and security concerns.

Some People Love It

That’s right. Some people enjoy being remarketed.

Thirty-eight percent of those that like the ad strategy said it’s because it allows them to find a better deal from a different seller.

On the other hand, the idea of having a personalized ad seems appealing to 25 percent, while another 19 percent use it as to postpone their purchases without losing research.

It Doesn’t Have A Strong Impact on Brand Image

Although 40 percent of the respondents found remarketing annoying or distracting, 53 percent said it does not affect how they perceive the brand.

Is Remarketing Right For Your Business?

Yes! However, you have to figure out the right way to do it.

In their publication, researchers from The Intent Lab provided a fascinating insight into how to make remarketing work for your brand. They’re calling the tactic Smart Remarketing.

It basically tells you how much and how long. For example, consumers said that seeing an ad more than once per day is too much.

More than half of the participants prefer once a week remarketing, while 39 percent accept only one day. About 24 percent are alright with two to three days of using this marketing technique, and 21 percent said one week is enough.

Read More: How to Leverage AI to Boost Your B2B Content Marketing

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Sumbo Bello

Sumbo Bello is a creative writer who enjoys creating data-driven content for news sites. In his spare time, he plays basketball and listens to Coldplay.

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