Science 2 min read

Researchers Develop New Tests for Early Detection of Autism

A team of British scientists has uncovered a method of effectively detecting signs of autism in young children with the use of blood and urine tests.

This new test could help specialists detect signs of autism in children far faster and more efficiently than before. ¦ Pixabay

This new test could help specialists detect signs of autism in children far faster and more efficiently than before. ¦ Pixabay

British scientists have reportedly developed new blood and urine tests that can help detect autism in children at an early stage. The test created by researchers from the University of Warwick is reportedly the first of its kind.

According to the research team, the test will not only lead to the early detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), but it will also allow clinicians to administer the necessary treatment earlier in the lives of the children.

Autism disorders include a wide variety of behavioral issues but are often characterized by a child’s struggle with establishing social interactions or communications, repetitive or compulsive behaviors, anxiety, and hyperactivity.

According to a report released by the World Health Organization, 1 in every 160 children is diagnosed with Autism. However, since autism has a wide variety of symptoms, it is quite difficult to detect, particularly at the early stages of its development.

New Blood and Urine Tests

The Warwick University researcher’s new blood and urine tests were reportedly built based on data that shows the link between ASD and damage to the proteins in blood plasma.

The newly developed tests use oxidation and glycation processes which modify proteins with the help of reactive oxygen species and sugar molecules.

The researchers claim that their tests were highly reliable when it comes to analyzing blood plasma. When tried, the tests revealed that children with autistic disorders have higher levels of oxidation marker dityrosine and sugar-modified compounds known as advanced glycation endproducts.

The team, in collaboration with the University of Birmingham and the University of Bologna, recruited 38 children diagnosed with autism together with a control group of 31 children.

Each child went through blood and urine sampling. Then, using artificial intelligence, the team developed a mathematical equation to determine children with Autistic disorders from the control group.

The results were allegedly impressive and far better than those produced by current ASD testing methods.

“With further testing, we may reveal specific plasma and urinary profiles – or ‘fingerprints’ – of compounds with damaging modifications. This may help us improve the diagnosis of ASD and point the way to new causes of ASD,” Naila Rabbani, lead author of the study, was quoted as saying.

Read More: QTrobot Seeks To Aid Students On The Autism Spectrum

Found this article interesting?

Let Rechelle Ann Fuertes know how much you appreciate this article by clicking the heart icon and by sharing this article on social media.


Profile Image

Rechelle Ann Fuertes

Rechelle is an SEO content producer, technical writer, researcher, social media manager, and visual artist. She enjoys traveling and spending time anywhere near the sea with family and friends.

Comments (0)
Most Recent most recent
You
share Scroll to top

Link Copied Successfully

Sign in

Sign in to access your personalized homepage, follow authors and topics you love, and clap for stories that matter to you.

Sign in with Google Sign in with Facebook

By using our site you agree to our privacy policy.